Thiel College

Course Offerings


AH 105: Taking Care of Your Health
2 CH   /  Offered Every Semester

A basic course for all students to investigate concepts of health, the structure and function of the health care delivery system, and the development of advocacy roles within complex systems.

AH 115: Food Patterns and Health
2 CH   /  Offered Every Semester

Food patterns and health is a course designed to study nutrition and health. Essential nutrients, metabolism and the digestive process, plus cultural and other influencing factors are some of the major topics.

BIO 110: Ethnobotany
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A broad cultural, scientific and economic survey of plants that are useful and harmful to humans. Students learn about the social impact of plants on culture while becoming knowledgeable of their characteristics and local uses. Laboratory exercises include the identification of the major groups of plants, fruits, flowers and seeds as well as the extraction and bioassay of plant chemicals. The laboratory will also include an outside activity such as a field collection of useful plants or a trip to an organic farm or a botanical garden. Three hours lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory. Offered spring of odd-numbered years, dependent on student interest and during June and July summer sessions.

BIO 116: Conservation Biology
3 CH   /  Offered Every Spring

The conservation and preservation of living resources (biodiversity). In addition to traditional wildlife management and forestry, attention is given to endangered species of all types of organisms, and threatened ecosystems, communities, habitats and genetic resources. Economic, ecological and aesthetic significance of natural life and habitats are considered with special emphasis on the effects of human activities on these natural phenomena. Case studies of conservation problems. Examination of conservation philosophies. Three lectures.

BIO 117: Medical Terminology
3 CH

A study of medical terms related to the language of health care, including origin, construction and meaning of medical terms presented within a context of techniques for successful mastery and practical utilization. The medical terminology will be presented relative to body systems. Medical records will be used as a learning tool and as a demonstration of usage. Three lectures per week. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

BIO 118: Human Evolution
3 CH   /  WIC

An exploration of the process that led to the emergence of humans from primate ancestors. The course will consider the evidence of the fossil record, comparisons between humans and related primates through molecular and behavioral analyses, and implications of the facts of human evolution for human studies today. Offered periodically according to instructor availability and student interest.

BIO 119: Introduction to Neuroscience
4 CH   /  Offered Every Fall   /  Lab Fee

A lecture/laboratory course that will introduce students to the field of neuroscience and provide prospective majors with the knowledge needed for further study of the neurosciences. An examination of the biological basis of neural and sensory function, motor and sensory systems and their integration as learning and memory, cognition, behavior and illness. The laboratory component provides an understanding of neuroscience through hands-on experimental procedures using state-of-the-art equipment and field trips to an affiliated research laboratory. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. (Can be used to satisfy IR "Citizenship in a Scientific Age" laboratory science course.) (P: HS/College GPA 3.0 or better, 1130 SAT/21 ACT, MATH 107/211 placement level)

BIO 125: Introduction to Ornithology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

An introduction to the study of birds. Topics include the mastery of visual and auditory skills required to identify birds; mastery of skills of record-keeping and reporting to maintain permanent records of bird sightings; the natural history, basic anatomy, physiology and evolutionary position of birds. Students will perform, analyze and report on experiments that test hypotheses regarding bird behavior. One two-hour lecture and one three-hour field study period per day during May summer session, plus special field trips.

BIO 145: Foundations of Biology
4 CH   /  Offered Every Semester   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A concepts-oriented, interdisciplinary study of the theories that serve as the foundation of contemporary biology. The principles of inheritance combined with evolutionary theory provide the basis for an exploration of contemporary issues in biology including the generation and maintenance of biodiversity, the biological basis of social behavior and the processes of natural and cultural selection. (Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory.)

BIO 191: Physiological Basis of Exercise and Physical Fitness
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

An overview of the physical and physiological aspects of exercise. Topics covered include biological systems necessary to adapt to exercise; the proper development of an exercise program; exercise and weight control; physiological aspects of exercise; and beneficial and detrimental aspects of exercise. Students will be required to design and implement a personal exercise program. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Offered spring of even-numbered years.

BIO 192: Biology of Aging
3 CH

An overview of biological and health factors and their influences upon the aging process. Processes caused by aging will be compared and contrasted with those caused by disuse, disease and unhealthy lifestyles. Biological theories of aging, changes in sensory and other bodily systems, and holistic health practices will be emphasized. Offered spring of even-numbered years, dependent on student interest.

BIO 209: Neuropsychopharmacology
4 CH   /  Offered Every Spring   /  Lab Fee

Students will be able to understand and explain administration, pharmacokinetics, behavioral effects and drug interactions of substances. Students will also be able to explain how psychoactive substances may be used to treat psychopathologies and disorders of the nervous system. The laboratory will study the modes of drug action using a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. (P: BIO 119 or NSCI 109 or PSY 109)

BIO 210: Religion and the Sciences
3 CH   /  WIC

This interdisciplinary seminar will investigate how religion and science have related and should relate to one another. The aim of the course is to present a comprehensive survey, comprehending both the historical developments of the relation and the current prospects for interaction and dialogue. The course will emphasize the relation between the natural sciences (especially the physical and biological sciences) and Western religion (especially Christianity) while at the same time recognizing diversity, especially at the level of philosophical and religious commitment. Offered periodically according to instructor availability and student interest.

BIO 212: Microbiology
4 CH   /  Offered Every Spring   /  Lab Fee

A study of microorganisms, emphasizing metabolism, nutrition, structure, reproduction, pathogenicity, evolution, ecological relations and economic importance. Laboratory exercises include isolation, enumeration, cultivation and identification of microorganisms, primarily bacteria. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratories. (P: BIO 145)

BIO 222: Entomology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A study of the principal insect orders and families, considering their morphology, physiology, bionomics, evolution and classification. Emphasis is placed on field study of local species and their identification, life cycle, habitat, behavior and significance in public health and agriculture. Included are construction of a personal collection of local insects and field study projects. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145) Offered fall of even-numbered years.

BIO 262: Animal Systematics
4 CH   /  Offered Every Spring   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A study of animal diversity, including animal classification schemes, environmental relationships and evolutionary history of animal groups. Connections among the characteristics of individual species, their current ecological requirements and the evolutionary pressures that produced those characteristics are emphasized. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145)

BIO 263: Plant Systematics
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A study of the characteristics of the major plant groups including plant classification and their phylogenetic relationships. An evolutionary theme is used to study structural characteristics, life histories, reproduction as well as the evolutionary and ecological implications of plant diversity. The laboratory utilizes live and preserved specimens representing the major groups of plants and includes a student collection and identification of local plants. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

BIO 272: Animal Behavior
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A comparative study of communication systems in animals, including humans. Sensory apparati and coordination and response systems are examined. Emphasis is placed on interactions between individuals in natural populations behavioral ecology. Recent information and theories on the nature of learning, social behavior, the evolution of behavior and the utility of concepts of animal behavior in applied biology. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145 or permission of instructor) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

BIO 273: Toxicology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

An interdisciplinary study of the negative effects of chemical and physical agents on living systems. The course focuses on mammalian systems and includes an investigation of the mechanisms of action and biological consequences of toxic agents at the molecular, cellular, organismic and ecosystem levels. Industrial toxicology, environmental toxicology and food toxicity and assessment are considered. (P: BIO 145; CHEM 160) Offered periodically, depending on student interest.

BIO 282: Comparative Chordate Anatomy
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A comparison of the morphology of vertebrates utilizing an evolutionary approach to organ systems. Emphasis is placed upon the development and structure of each organ system found in the vertebrate organism. The laboratory consists of dissection of species from at least two classes of vertebrates which illustrate the principles learned in lecture. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145 and 162 or permission of instructor) Offered fall of even-numbered years.

BIO 284: Human Anatomy
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

An examination of the structure of the human organism. A systematic description of the organs and organ systems found in the human will be presented in lecture. The laboratory will consist of systematic dissection of the cat and the study of human models. Three lectures and one three hour laboratory per week. (P: BIO 145 or permission of the instructor) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

BIO 293: Immunology/Parasitology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A study of the complex interactions between parasitic organisms and their hosts. Internal and external parasites and their vectors are considered. The overall ability of the host to respond, as well as specific reactions to important parasites are discussed. The effects of parasites and their associated diseases and of preventative and curative measures involved in their control are included. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

BIO 294: Human Physiology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A study of the activity of the organ systems of the human. Function will be examined at the molecular as well as at the integrated systems level. The relationship of structure to function will be emphasized. The laboratory consists of experiments designed to demonstrate and/or to amplify principles presented in lecture. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. (P: BIO 145 or permission of the instructor) Offered spring of even-numbered years.

BIO 302: Plant Physiology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A study of the processes in plants and subsequent growth and development. Processes studied include photosynthesis, respiration, ion absorption, translocation, stomatal function, transpiration, hormonal activity, flowering and seed formation. As a study of producers, this course will examine those organisms so important because of their position in the energy pyramid and the food web. Three hours of lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory. Recommended: CHEM 200 or permission of instructor. Recommended for second semester sophomore and above. (P: BIO 145; CHEM 140, 160) Offered spring of even-numbered years.

BIO 322: Genetics
4 CH   /  Offered Every Fall   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A study of the nature of hereditary materials, replication and genetic control of metabolism, development, behavior, evolution and all biological functions. A consideration of the implications of genetic techniques and genetic theory for humans. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory. (P: BIO 145 or permission of instructor; CHEM 200 recommended)

BIO 342: Introduction to Methods
4 CH   /  Offered Every Spring   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

Applications of biological and statistical methods of biology to real world situations. Major consideration will be given to methods that assess the health of aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems. The laboratory will emphasize applications of statistical methods to experimental design, collection techniques and data analysis; lectures will emphasize the synthesis of information collected. Both a formal paper and presentation will be required at the course's conclusion. Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. (P: junior biology major or permission of the instructor)

BIO 343: Developmental Biology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A study of the development of biological organisms. Topics to be considered are gametogenesis, fertilization, cell division, morphogenetic movements, differentiation and organogenesis. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the underlying mechanisms of the developmental processes common to microorganisms, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Related phenomena such as metamorphosis, regeneration and aging will also be considered. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145) Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

BIO 352: Animal Physiology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A comparative study of the functional features of whole organisms and their component organs and organ systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding basic physiological processes found in vertebrates and invertebrates. Physiological function as it is related to survival of organisms in their natural environments is stressed. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory-discussion. (P: BIO 145) Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

BIO 392: General Ecology
4 CH   /  Offered Every Fall   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

Current concepts of plant and animal population and community ecology including statistical analysis of field-collected data. Major consideration is given to population growth and regulation, organism interactions, productivity, material cycles and community relations. The laboratory will include participation in a long-term project observing plant and animal interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Recommended for the junior-level student. (P: BIO 145; one of BIO 212, 222, 262 or 263 and junior level status)

BIO 393: Cell Biology: A Molecular Approach
4 CH   /  Offered Every Spring   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A molecular approach to cell structure and function. Membranes, transport processes and biochemical mechanisms are stressed. Energetics, kinetics, regulation and interaction of cellular systems are emphasized. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Not recommended for students with freshman or sophomore standing. (P: BIO 145; CHEM 200 recommended)

BIO 394: Aquatic Ecology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee

A study of aquatic habitats as ecosystems. Major consideration is given to trophic structure, limiting factors, community and population relations, and pollution effects. Various aquatic organisms are studied in both the field and the laboratory. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145; one of BIO 212, 222, 262 or 263) Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

BIO 395: Junior Research Seminar
1 CH   /  WIC

A seminar type course designed to aid students in preparing a research proposal for the required senior year research project. One contact hour per week. Offered periodically according to instructor availability and student interest.

BIO 399: Molecular Biology
4 CH   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

A study of the major molecular components of the cell, emphasizing specifics of proteins and nucleic acids involved in DNA replication, Transcription, Translation. Molecular, Biotechnology and/or Microbial Genetic techniques will be introduced in the class and laboratory sections. Three hours of lecture per week and one three-hour laboratory. (P: BIO 145, BIO 393 or BIO 322; CHEM 160; CHEM 200 or CHEM 210 recommended) Offered spring even numbered years.

BIO 402: Internship in Biology
Credit Hours Vary

An opportunity for senior students to gain practical experience in a field related to their major. A log book will be required as well as a final paper in which the student will react to the internship both objectively and subjectively, correlating his or her academic knowledge with practical experience. A minimum of 40 hours of supervised experience per credit hour is required. Senior status, petition of department. Available as permitted by faculty load time. All arrangements must be completed in the semester prior to registration.

BIO 452: Advanced Biology
Credit Hours Vary   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

Individual studies in biology. Students design and conduct a reading project or research project in an area of biology. The research project must include library, laboratory and/or field research, and a written report in the format of a scientific publication. The project is done under the guidance of one faculty member and may be conducted for more than one semester. Arrangements with the faculty supervisor are required prior to registration. Grade is IP until project is finished. (P: 15 credit hours in biology)

BIO 455: Cooperative Education
Credit Hours Vary

BIO 462: Senior Seminar in Biology
2 CH   /  Offered Every Fall   /  WIC

Integration of key ideas of biological science and processes of life into a philosophy of biology. Emphasis on constructive criticism of scientific arguments. Presentation of formal papers and talks. Participation in discussion. Two hours of seminar class. (P: senior biology major or 24 hours of biology and permission of instructor)

BIO 472: Special Topics in Biology
1-3 CH

Intensive readings in a specialized aspect of biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Available only when faculty load permits. Arrangements must be completed at least one semester before the course begins. Formal report is required. Weekly meetings with instructor. A minimum of 40 hours of study per credit hour is required. (P: 20 hours of biology)

BIO 482: Independent Study
Credit Hours Vary   /  Lab Fee   /  WIC

Individual studies in biology for students who have achieved a 3.25 GPA in their biology courses. Students design and conduct a reading project or a research project in an area of biology. The research project must include library, laboratory and/or field research, and a written report in the format of a scientific publication. The project is done under the guidance of one faculty member and may be conducted for more than one semester. Arrangements with the faculty supervisor are required prior to registration. Grade is IP until project is finished. (P: 15 credit hours in biology)

CSD 111: Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders
3 CH   /  Offered Every Fall

An introduction to the scientific study of communication, the nature of communication disorders and the professions of audiology and speech-language pathology. An exploration and foundation of the etiology, diagnosis and therapeutic methodology of various communication disorders across the lifespan. This introductory-level course is the foundation of all other CSD courses and may also serve as an elective course for allied health care and education majors, introducing them to the nature of communication disorders. The prerequisite for the CSD courses.

CSD 191: Acoustical Phonetics
3 CH

A study of physiology of sound production dealing with the physical properties of sounds themselves, not how they are meaningful, introducing students to the transcription of normal and disordered speech sounds following the principles of the International Phonetic Alphabet. This course presents the limitations of spelling and the relationships among the phonemes of the English language. (Can be used to satisfy IR "Choosing Depth & Diversity" science.)

CSD 193: Nature and Development of Language
3 CH   /  Offered Every Fall   /  WIC

An examination of the components of language (phonology, syntax and lexicon), the theories regarding how children develop language and the sequence of acquisition of language components. (P: CSD 111 or permission of instructor) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CSD 214: Speech and Hearing Science
3 CH

The study of speech and hearing mechanisms. Major emphasis will be placed on the physiology of the normal speech and hearing mechanism, physics of sound and how they interact acoustically. (P: CSD 111 or permission of instructor) Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

CSD 215: Anatomy and Physiology of the Vocal Mechanism
3 CH

The study of the structure and function of the mechanism that supports the basic functions of speech: respiration, phonation, articulation and resonance. The neuroanatomy for speech and language is examined. An introduction to the abnormalities that affect articulation and swallowing. (P: CSD 111 or permission of instructor) Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CSD 218: Sign Language I
3 CH   /  Offered Every Fall

A presentation of different methods of sign language and their historical derivations. The students will acquire a conversational level in sign language and finger spelling. This course may also serve as an elective course for those interested in communicating with the deaf and hard of hearing.

CSD 220: Auditory Disorders
4 CH

An examination of the nature of sound and sound perception and the anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism. The nature of hearing disorders, including their medical, social, psychological and education parameters will be invested. Students are introduced to basic audiometric evaluation techniques. (P: CSD 111, CSD 214, or permission of instructor) Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

CSD 318: Sign Language II
3 CH   /  Offered Every Spring

An advancement of Sign Language I designed to further develop the students' ability to communicate more effectively through sign language. Students will gain an understanding of deaf culture and the deaf community. (P: CSD 218)

CSD 370: Communication Disorders in Adults
3 CH   /  WIC

A study of basic anatomical, physiological and neurological processes of communication and how these processes change normally with age. Students will also examine specific adult communication disorders and develop strategies to maximize communicative functioning. (P: CSD 111 or permission of the instructor) Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CSD 391: Communication Disorders in Children
4 CH   /  WIC

A study of communication disorders in children with emphasis on methods of evaluation and diagnosis. (P: CSD 111 or permission of instructor) Offered spring of odd-numbered years.

CSD 395: Aural Rehabilitation
3 CH

A study of approaches to aural rehabilitation, including auditory training, speech reading and speech retraining. Students will observe and practice the clinical application of these approaches. (P: CSD 111 and CSD 214) Offered spring of even-numbered years.

CSD 420: Clinical Practicum
1-3 CH   /  Offered Every Semester

An observation of diagnostic testing and therapy with communication-disordered children and adults to acquire credit for observation hours as required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Students will begin by writing objectives for therapy sessions and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. Must be a junior or senior CSD major with a 3.0 in the major. (P: CSD 111 plus successful completion of 15 CH of CSD titled coursework)

CSD 450: Current Topics in Audiology
3 CH

This capstone course will introduce students to the principles of evidence-based practice and its impact on clinical decision making in the diagnosis and treatment of hearing disorders. Students will gain experience in problem solving, working as a team to define the hearing deficit, and developing an appropriate rehabilitation plan. Current Topics in Audiology is relevant to those pre-professional students needing to be familiar with issues in hearing disorders. (P: CSD 111, plus two of the following: CSD 214, CSD 220, CSD 395) Offered fall of even-numbered years.

CSD 460: Intergenerational Internship in Communication Sciences and Disorders
1-3 CH   /  WIC

Students will observe diagnostic testing and therapy with communication-disordered children and adults. Communication sciences and disorders early childhood and gerontology field work will provide an interactive, intergenerational partnership, fostering the quality of life throughout the lifespan for those individuals with communication disorders. This advanced-level clinical practicum course is designed to expand clinical competencies through on-site experiences at the Children's Center of Mercer County and St. Paul's. Offered every semester. (P: 111. Student will be in good academic standing with completion of at least 2 CH of CSD 420 (Clinical Practicum) and have observed a minimum of 25 hours of treatment as administered or supervised by American Speech-Language-Hearing (ASHA) speech-language pathologists/audiologists.)

CSD 471: Central Auditory Processing Disorders
1 CH

Audiologists and speech-language pathologists have critical roles in the assessment and differential diagnosis of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD). This self-study experience will introduce students to the screening, assessment and treatment of CAPD. Early detection and intervention are critical to helping at-risk youngsters succeed in the academic environment. (P: open to senior CSD majors only).

CSD 472: Emergent Literacy
1 CH

Emergent literacy knowledge paves the way for preschooler and kindergartner development of literacy skills, which include reading and spelling. Young children experiencing emergent literacy deficits may have insufficient knowledge to benefit from early reading instruction, placing them at risk in their ability to meet the academic challenges of first grade and beyond. Early detection and intervention are critical to helping at-risk youngsters succeed in the academic environment. (P: senior CSD majors only).

CSD 473: Ethical Considerations: Nutrition/End of Life
1 CH

Speech-language pathologists (SLP) have critical roles in assessing and treating individuals at the "end-of-life". Patients and families are faced with decisions regarding the withholding of hydration and nutrition. The purpose of this activity is to examine end-of-life decisions and provide practical, ethical resolutions to help caregivers work effectively with patients and families.